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Training gap overshadows malaysias islamic finance growth


Oct 29 Finding a job is often harder than expected for graduates hoping to enter Malaysia's Islamic banking industry, the world's second-largest with $124 billion in assets - employers are proving choosy about qualifications. Thousands of students, a large number of them Muslims from across the globe, have flocked to the many Islamic finance courses offered in Malaysia, seeing them as springboards to a career. Malaysia has an estimated 50 course providers and 18 universities which offer Islamic finance degrees, and it boasts the largest academic output globally. The country has published 169 research papers on Islamic finance in the last three years, according to data from Thomson Reuters. But while the Malaysian Islamic banking industry's output in monetary terms is growing about 20 percent annually, employment in it is expanding at less than half that rate - even though an additional 22,400 jobs are needed to support the growth, according to a blueprint for the financial sector prepared by the central bank. Malaysia is experiencing a problem faced by Islamic finance sectors around the world: training and qualifications often do not provide the levels of specialism and sophistication that employers need. The problem is limiting growth of the industry and, some say, stifling innovation that is necessary to bring Islamic finance fully into line with religious principles, and prevent its products from merely being pale reflections of conventional financial instruments."A common misunderstanding of these young graduates is that they believe there is such a thing as a generic job in Islamic finance. In reality, the industry is looking to employ specialists," said Raymond Madden, chief executive of the Asian Institute of Finance (AIF), set up by Malaysia's central bank to develop human capital for the region's financial industry. This means graduates are often inadequately equipped, and few in the industry are actively trying to solve the problem, he said."It's a major issue - nobody wants to take ownership of training graduates in areas that are most needed by the industry," added Sofiza Azmi, AIF's head of strategy and development. The Islamic finance sector's need for specific skills in risk management as well as internal audit and governance, plus a basic grounding in sharia law, is not being communicated, she said."Moving forward you need to understand where the banks are going, how they are going to expand, what their plans are. Then you can map out their talent needs."

YOUNG One reason for the skills mismatch in Islamic finance is the youth of the industry; it was born in its modern form in the 1970s, and in many countries has only become a mainstream industry in the past decade. The industry has moved into relatively complex areas, such as Islamic money market instruments and hybrid Islamic bonds with equity-liked characteristics, only in the last few years. The fragmentation of Islamic financial regulation, with sharia boards and national regulators in various countries taking different approaches to some core products and concepts, may also be an obstacle to effective training. Employers could provide some of that specialised training, but banks in Malaysia have so far been reluctant to do so because of the time and cost involved. Instead they tend to poach skilled staff from rivals, a quicker and cheaper alternative."The banks will have to step up. If they need people specialising in areas, they will have to train internally," Azmi added.

Universities also need to revamp their curricula to suit industry needs, but it inevitably takes a long time to evaluate and implement changes, she said. Malaysian authorities have responded by trying to intervene directly in the job market; the International Centre for Education in Islamic Finance (INCEIF) was set up by Malaysia's central bank in 2009 to help with training. But Syed Othman Alhabshi, INCEIF's chief academic officer, said the centre's signature Chartered Islamic Finance Professional qualification, a one-year postgraduate programme, had only attracted a handful of industry executives to its staff. Only five of the centre's full-time lecturers boast actual exposure to the sector and most have retired from active involvement in the corporate world, he said. The centre's 12-member professional development panel, which meets quarterly, has only two Islamic bank heads, from Bank Islam and OCBC Al-Amin. About 60 percent of INCEIF's graduates find employment within six months, according to an internal survey, the centre said, declining to provide further details of the survey. While the centre's programmes have evolved over time, its graduates are not designed to be specialists, so the task of further training falls on banks, said Syed.

"Our first job is to train them. If they can get a job here, its fine. But if not, we can't do much. It's up to the employer whether they want to take the extra mile."Syed added that job opportunities for Islamic finance graduates were limited partly because companies such as Maybank Islamic, the largest Islamic bank in Asia, did not need large workforces as they could leverage staff from their parent firms - in Maybank's case, Malayan Banking. AIF hopes a new advisory panel comprising representatives from across the industry can close the gap. A new Financial Services Talent Council, being planned by the central bank, is to include individuals from the education ministry, Islamic banks and universities, in the hope of setting a national agenda for the industry's talent needs."If you've got this diversity of people to discuss a particular issue, you'll be able to come up with a better solution," Azmi said. ACCESS Many foreign students expect easy access to Malaysia's job market when they obtain local Islamic finance qualifications, but some are turned down because banks face costly, time-consuming visa requirements to hire foreign students."They waste one year here, and many of them are upset with this," said Omar Alaeddin, an INCEIF graduate and current member of its student representative council. So many students return to their home countries with Malaysian Islamic finance qualifications. This has the benefit of spreading knowledge globally, but the students can also have difficulty finding jobs back home."At the beginning they come here thinking there are hundreds of banks and employees," said Alaeddin, who teaches risk management and sharia auditing at Universiti Kuala Lumpur."Then some go back and work in their previous jobs, which have nothing to do with Islamic finance."

Your money want to save big money consider the no booze budget


(The writer is a Reuters contributor. The opinions expressed are his own.)By Chris TaylorNEW YORK, Sept 12 Would you give up alcohol to help balance the family budget?I posed that very question on social media recently. These were some of the answers I got:"Yeah, right.""Gosh no - it's what gets us through the week.""As if that would ever happen."And so on, in the same vein. Most responses ranged from sarcastic to outright incredulous. But one other answer stood out, which got to the heart of the matter:"I quit drinking - and it was like we won the lottery!"

And there's the rub. We all tend to complain, in an era of stagnant incomes and rising prices, about how we just can't make ends meet. There is just no place we could possibly find more savings. But is that really true? Consider this: The average U.S. household spent $445 on wine, beer and spirits in 2013, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. That amounts to roughly 1 percent of our household expenditures, and it compares with an average household figure of $268 in 1993. That is more than we spend on all nonalcoholic beverages combined, by the way. Keep in mind those averages include nondrinkers, too. That means some households are spending much, much more than that already-hefty average on alcohol. So let's be honest with ourselves. It is not always the case that we can't squeeze any more savings out of our budgets. It is that we choose not to, because we just don't want to give up the booze. When New York City's Jenna Hollenstein sat down one day and calculated what her drinking was costing her, she was shocked.

The 39-year-old dietician used to enjoy a nice bottle of wine or some gin after work, and it was starting to add up. "Even if it was only a $15 bottle of wine, three times a week, that was $45," she remembers. "That's $180 a month, or over $2,000 a year."That's a significant amount of money - and that's not even including going out for cocktails with friends."Hollenstein finally decided to give up her pricey habit, and even wrote a book on her experiences, "Drinking to Distraction." But she is hardly alone in having a taste for a nip after work. After all, 64 percent of American adults report drinking occasionally, according to Gallup's most recent poll on consumption habits. Through boom times and bust, one of our most consistent national traits is that we enjoy our booze, and are not willing to give it up."We've been asking this question since the 1930s, and the numbers are remarkably constant," says Frank Newport, Gallup's editor in chief. "Even in an era of huge demographic changes, the percentage of drinkers just doesn't seem to budge."

BEER OR WINE? Beer is America's beverage of choice, by the way, followed by wine and then spirits. The average drinker enjoys a shade over four alcoholic beverages a week, according to the Gallup poll. But 9 percent of people have more than eight drinks over the same period, and 5 percent of folks are guzzling more than 20. And that can get very expensive indeed - especially if you do your drinking in restaurants or bars with high markups. We might not even realize how much we are spending on this habit, since it drips out in relatively small increments - a beer or two here, a carafe of wine there. Personal-finance expert Tiffany Aliche, author of "The One Week Budget," suggests forcing yourself to do the math - just as Hollenstein did - before tossing back yet another nightcap."Let's say you drink three nights a week and spend $30 each time," she says. "That's over $4,000 a year, or as much as a trip to Paris or Rome."It is not an all-or-nothing proposition, notes Aliche, who is not a drinker herself. You don't have to become a teetotaler in order to realize massive savings. "Instead of drinking three times a week, just drink twice - and then go on your vacation, too," she advises. As for Hollenstein, who had a long and complex relationship with alcohol, she thought it was best to give up drinking altogether. She did not necessarily do it for the money - but when she did, she noticed that her finances changed overnight."As soon as I gave it up, the money thing became so clear," she says. "Drinking was just a mindless, habitual thing I did on a daily basis. And I didn't really notice it - until I got my credit card bill or looked at my bank account."